What Doctor Treats Arthritis? Rheumatologists are specialists in arthritis and diseases that involve bones, muscles and joints. They are trained to make difficult diagnoses and to treat all types of arthritis, especially those requiring complex treatment. You may be referred to an orthopedist if you have a type of degenerative arthritis.

Can doctors do anything for arthritis? Your doctor has a number of options to help you manage pain, prevent damage to the joint, and keep inflammation at bay. Treatment of arthritis could include rest, occupational or physical therapy, hot or cold compresses, joint protection, exercise, drugs, and sometimes surgery to correct joint damage.

What do you call a doctor that works with arthritis? A rheumatologist is a doctor of internal medicine who specializes in arthritis and other musculoskeletal conditions and systemic autoimmune diseases. These diseases can cause pain, swelling, and stiffness in joints, muscles, and bones.

Can an xray show arthritis? X-Ray. X-rays give a two-dimensional picture of your joints. They show joint space narrowing (a sign of arthritis), erosions, fractures, lower-than normal bone density and bone spurs.





How does a doctor diagnose arthritis?

Doctors usually diagnose arthritis using the patient’s medical history, physical examination, X-rays, and blood tests. It is possible to have more than one form of arthritis at the same time. There are many forms of arthritis, and diagnosing the specific type you have can help your doctor determine the best treatment.

When should I go to the doctor for joint pain?

When to see a doctor for joint pain Joint pain doesn’t subside after five or six days. The joint locks, catches or gives way. Joint is red, hot or very swollen. Also, see a doctor if you are experiencing fever, chills or night sweats.

Does rheumatologist treat osteoarthritis?

Rheumatologists – Rheumatologists specialize in musculoskeletal diseases and autoimmune conditions. They treat all types of arthritis, including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis.

Does arthritis hurt all the time?

Many people who have arthritis or a related disease may be living with chronic pain. Pain is chronic when it lasts three to six months or longer, but arthritis pain can last a lifetime. It may be constant, or it may come and go.

Is arthritis a disability?

Many people may wonder is arthritis a disability. Yes. Arthritis can prompt incapacity, as can numerous other mental and physical conditions. If your arthritis confines your daily movements, or activities you may qualify for disability benefits.

What is the main cause of arthritis?

Arthritis is caused by inflammation of the joints. Osteoarthritis usually comes with age and most often affects the fingers, knees, and hips. Sometimes osteoarthritis follows a joint injury. For example, you might have badly injured your knee when young and develop arthritis in your knee joint years later.

Does arthritis show up in blood tests?

No blood test can definitively prove or rule out a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, but several tests can show indications of the condition. Some of the main blood tests used include: erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) – which can help assess levels of inflammation in the body.

What is arthritis pain like?

In general, the first sign of arthritis is pain, also called arthralgia. This can feel like a dull ache or a burning sensation. Often, pain starts after you’ve used the joint a lot, for example, if you’ve been gardening or if you just walked up a flight of stairs. Some people feel soreness first thing in the morning.

What is the best doctor to see for osteoarthritis?

Orthopedists are surgeons who address bone and joint diseases and injuries, such as arthritis, osteoarthritis, and body trauma.

Should I see a rheumatologist for arthritis?

If you’re having joint symptoms that cause concern, an appointment with a primary care practitioner is a good place to start. But sometimes arthritis is difficult to diagnose. You might need to see a specialist. Rheumatologists are specialists in arthritis and diseases that involve bones, muscles and joints.

What is the difference between arthritis and osteoarthritis?

Osteoarthritis is a so-called mechanical condition characterized by the gradual wearing down of cartilage in the joints. Aging is the most common risk factor for osteoarthritis. Arthritis, on the other hand, is not caused by the normal wear and tear of bones.

What does arthritis look like on xray?

An arthritis joint will demonstrate narrowing of the space between the bones as the cartilage thins, bone spurs on the edges of the joint, small cysts within the bone, and sometimes deformity of the joint, causing it to look crooked.

What does arthritis in legs feel like?

Discomfort can occur in the affected legs, thighs, calves, hips, buttocks, or feet. In addition to pain, other common sensations are heaviness, numbness, or aching in the leg muscles. Rest usually helps.

Can an MRI show arthritis?

MRI is the most effective way to diagnose problems within any joint and the image sensitivity makes it the most accurate imaging tool available in detecting arthritis and other inflammatory changes. MRI is also a key diagnostic tool when patients have lower back pain, radiating pain or hip/groin pain.

What is the most painful type of arthritis?

Gout is one of the most painful forms of arthritis. This condition is caused by elevated levels of uric acid, a bodily waste product, in the bloodstream. Symptoms of gout occur when uric acid crystals accumulate in the joints and surrounding soft tissue, causing an inflammatory response in the affected areas.

Can arthritis stop you from walking?

Arthritis in certain parts of the body can make it more difficult to walk. Here’s how to deal with these changes in your gait and remain mobile. Having arthritis in your hips, knees, ankles, or feet can making walking harder — a side effect that can have consequences for your daily well-being and quality of life.